The Glow at the Horizon ||31||

1The fire in the quarters, if yellow, indicates peril to the king; if fiery in colour, the ruin of the country; and if rubicund and observed with wind from the left, it causes destruction of the crops.
2That, which owing to great brilliance creates illumination and reveals shadow also as the San does, portends great calamity to the king. A blood-red one indicates the raging of the sword (war).
3-4The fire seen in the east bodes evil to the Kshatriyas with their chieftains; in the south-east, to the smiths and boys (or princes?) » in the south, to the Vaisyas along with cruel men; m the south-west, to envoys and widows that have remarried; in the west, to Sudras and agriculturists; in the north-west, to thieves and horses; in the north, to the Brahmins; and in the north-east, to the heretics and merchants.
5A calm sky, glossy and bright stars, breeze blowing in a clockwise direction, and the fire at the horizon with the hue of gold, is for the good of mankind and kings.