Signs of Rubies ||82||

1-2Rubies are born of Sulphur, Kuravinda and crystal. Those produced from sulphur show the lustre of bees, antimony, lily, rose-apple or Rasa (myrrh). Those that arise from Kuruvinda are grey, of pale lustre and mixed with mineral substances; those coming from crystal are lustrous, multi-coloured and pure.
3Smooth, illuminating with rays, very pore, sparkling, heavy, of good shape, brilliant within and bright red—such are the good qualities of these precious stones in general.
4Stones are defective, if they are impure, of doll lustre, full of scratches, mixed with mineral substances, broken, ill-perforated, not attractive and mixed with gravel.
5They affirm that on the head of snakes there is a gem, hued like a bee or peacock’s tail, and shining like the flame of a lamp. Such a one is to be known as of inestimable value.
6A king wearing such a snake gem will never be subjected to the sufferings arising from poison and disease; Indra will always be pouring rain in his realm; and by the power of the gem, the king will extirpate his enemies.
7-11The price of a single ruby weighing a Pala (4 Karshas) is, we are taught 26,000 silver pieces (i.e., Karsha panas); one of three Karshas is worth 20,000 pieces silver; one of half a Pala, 12,000 pieces silver; one of one Karsha, 6,000 pieces silver one of eight Retties, 3,000 pieces silver; one of four Retries, 1,000 pieces silver; one of two Retries, 500 pieces silver. The price of rubies of intermediate weight must be calculated proportionally, and with due regard to their being of inferior or superior quality. A stone deficient in colour fetches half the usage price; one lacking brilliance, an eighth part; one with few good and many bad qualities fetches 20-th of the standard price. A stone somewhat dusky, with many scratches and few good features will 2 tenth. Such is the price of rubies as stated by the ancient seers.